E-sports

Opportunity Abounds: Sports Betting in Indian Country will evolve naturally and be profitable for the smartest operators

Since the repeal of PASPA (Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act) in May 2018 through the Supreme Court decision in Murphy v. NCAA, United States markets have pushed forward to legalize sports betting.

Thirty U.S. jurisdictions have legalized sports betting and more than 22 of those are now operational.  Many of the remaining states provide strong opportunities for tribal communities to take advantage of this expansion.

While opportunity abounds for tribes in sports betting, it’s about getting it right, not speed to market.  One of the main reasons PASPA was overturned was because of states’ rights issues.  Each state will take its own approach to how sports betting may fit into its existing gaming product.

In some cases, sports betting might not be incorporated at all.

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Research Brief: State Legislative Update on U.S. Sports Betting & Online Gaming – May 2021

Three years into the repeal of PASPA, the sports betting world continues to move forward at a quick pace. The challenges of the last year continue in various facets of the sports calendar that has not quite returned to normal, as well as occasional challenges still with athletes having to go through COVID-19 protocols. As fans will likely return to the stands with the goal of having 100 percent capacity in many cases by the fall, it will bring some normalcy back to the game and eventually, the schedule.

Some 30 states and jurisdictions have now legalized sports betting in some form, with others still having discussions on how to craft an ideal market that suits their needs. What continues not to be normal over some of the recent states is how they are crafting their own markets that are either reinventing the wheel or now reviewing best practices to create the ideal market in terms of competition and revenue potential to the state. At this point, most legislative sessions are closing out their 2021 session heading into June. However, more than a handful of states operate a year-round legislative session. The year 2021 will likely be known as the year that had some more interesting markets crafted which may cause challenges down the way for other states that have yet to legalize.

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Research Brief: PASPA U.S. Sports Betting Three Years Later – May 2021

Three years ago, the Supreme Court of the United States (“SCOTUS”) made a historic decision in Murphy v. NCAA, in favor of states’ rights and overturning the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (“PASPA”). In this decision on PASPA, the Supreme Court has allowed sports betting to now spread across the country with operational sports books in 22 jurisdictions (21 states and the District of Columbia)/ There are eight other jurisdictions (seven states and Puerto Rico) where sports betting is legal, but legislators and regulators are working through the next steps to bring the total number to 30 jurisdictions that have pushed forward since the repeal of PASPA three years ago today.  while some did not expect such a rapid expansion in such a short time, credit is due to Governor Chris Christie for initially pushing this effort on behalf of New Jersey.  It was this initial legal effort that was the catalyst for public opinion to grow in favor of sports betting.  Any assumptions that the overturning of PASPA was done by a public affairs effort, and not by the legal foundations or arguments, discredits the judicial process and the legal framework associated with separation of powers in the United States.

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Research Brief: State Legislative Update on U.S. Sports Betting & Online Gaming – April 2021

The more things change, the more they stay the same

A year after the start of the Great Shutdown, the gaming and sports worlds are returning. The NCAA Division I Men’s basketball tournament ran its course with no major problems. The Masters is in full bloom in Augusta, and MLB threw its first pitch at the start of this month. This is all occurring while fans are returning to games and events as stadium capacity increases.

Legislative sessions are also in full bloom, with most of these sessions hitting their stride as some deadlines have passed while others are fast approaching. Several states are trying to get sports betting across the finish line before their session expires. Many of these are running into challenges, not just from a timing standpoint but also due to the legislative process. As seen in Georgia, sports betting died because of the voter law and the difference between parties. This is just one example of how legislation can either be changed dramatically, get killed, or die under its own death through the sheer weight of the process of legislation. While the issues may change over time, the same factors can make or break the process and cause well-intentioned groups and caucuses come apart because of other issues.

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Research Brief: State Legislative Update on U.S. Sports Betting & Online Gaming – March 2021

March Madness is Upon Us

For the first time in two years, sports fans will be able to wager on the NCAA Division I Men’s basketball tournament.  While the tournament went dark last year because of the Great Shutdown, legal sports betting has expanded significantly across the country since last March.  However, this does not preclude though the office pools that will still take place, especially in jurisdictions that still do not have legal sports wagering.  The NCAA tournament is one of the largest wagering opportunities in the year, in addition to the Super Bowl that took place just over one month ago.

One of the challenges that will be faced those in legal states is the ability to wager on the ‘home team’, as several of these states have banned wagers placed on local teams and contests including college sports taking place in that jurisdiction.  States across the country are looking to provide these same athletes with the ability to profit from their name, image, and likeness (“NIL”) but provide them “cover” when it comes to wagers being placed legal on them.  However, keeping student-athletes off the legal books only allows an illegal market to continue, exposing these athletes to more harms than protections.  For the integrity of the tournament and student-athletes, the best place for any sports wager is in the legal market without restrictions.

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Peer-To-Peer Esports Sanctioning Organization

Peer-to-peer play is hardly a new concept. It is simply a system which provides the necessary means for competition to take place. Competitions may vary and may involve providing the necessary physical or virtual space to enable the competition to take place, supplying the equipment to facilitate the activity, arranging for both the space and the equipment or neither.

Peer-to-peer play operators would be responsible for the integrity of the competition by certifying that the necessary rules are complied with as well as ensuring that the tournament conditions offer a fully level playing field, proper matchmaking, and no cheating.

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A Sporting Chance

Esports has grabbed the attention of more than just the gaming industry, and for good reason.

The industry’s rapid rise has benefited from numerous omnichannel platforms that allow for unprecedented viewership and engagement from a diverse audience. With the “new abnormal” defined by Covid-19, esports has proven that media consumption is not just about what people can watch on the major networks. Instead, people are turning to streaming platforms like Twitch and YouTube for competitive-based content

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